(New Bloom Magazine, 2015. Military Hardware on Display)

*Replace pie charts with military pic of tanks

Other Scales: Institutional, Governmental, Corporate

Section
2. Reduce Consumption
Page
2.9

It has oft been stated that T10 focusses, or at least starts, at the personal scale, for reasons of understandability, but it would be irresponsible to ignore the importance of consumption – and drivers – at larger scales. Domestic consumption is enmeshed within wider spheres of government, business, services and infrastructure, which both consume and direct much of what comprises our total footprint. A simple example of some representative countries and cities around the Mediterranean by the Global Footprint Network demonstrates this below1:

 

 

Between 20% and 30% of per capita footprint is attributable to ‘Services’, ‘Government’, and ‘Infrastructure’, and this is before we consider the power and influence of the Finance sector over all activities in the pie charts. Further thought makes this unsurprising when we think of how large, for instance, services such as health are (hospitals, ambulances, clinics, disposable materials, laundry, etc…), or government activities like defence, which can be very large indeed in some countries. Add infrastructure to this equation (bridges, ports, freeways, etc…) and this is a significant ‘load’ on any environment. These areas are not as susceptible to direct personal intervention as, say, clothing is through one’s garment- purchasing decisions, but nonetheless, are not unassailable, and our interaction with them – and hopefully influence over them – is explored in sections 4, 6 and 8.

 

 

1 Global Footprint Network, 2021. City and Regional Work – Global Footprint Network

2 New Bloom Magazine, 2015. China’s Military Parade and the Specter of Historical Memory | New Bloom Magazine

 

 

 

 

 

Explore Other Pages Reduce Consumption

2.1 Context and Clarifications

“I consume, therefore I am”   Poor Reneé Descartes couldn’t have known how wrong he was in 1637 when he penned “I think, therefore I am”. I am not being facetious at all when I write the above; I really think that the majority of the worl...

2.2 Consumption Fever

This is Albert, the Magic Pudding, ‘magic’ because: “A peculiar thing about the Puddin’ was that, though they had all had a great many slices off him, there was no sign of the place whence the slices had been cut. ‘That’s where the Magic comes in,...

2.3 Introducing Ecological Footprint Analysis

Dealing with the natural world is daunting, such is its size and complexity. Getting a fix on humanity and its blizzard of activities and effects, is similarly daunting. It’s no wonder, then, that it is so hard to get any sort of perspective, any ...

2.4 Using Ecological Footprint Analysis

Hopefully, webpage 2.3 has introduced the ‘Footprint’ concept sufficiently well to enable readers to be ready to apply it, both personally, and to cities, regions, countries or sectors, of interest. Footprint’s ‘home base’ is the Global Footpri...

2.5 Food

While webpages 2.1-4 have attempted to provide some overview on consumption, it is time now to focus on specific significant areas. Food, accounting for up to a third of our consumptive impact, well and truly qualifies as ‘significant’. On clos...

2.6 Housing/Shelter

The next, ‘big ticket’ item, is housing, or shelter, which – depending on the measurement system – ranks alongside food as the major personal consumptive impact. Shelter consumes enormous resources in its construction, maintenance and operation, b...

2.7 Transport/Mobility

Global Footprint Analysis tells us that, worldwide, this accounts for 15% of our personal impact1, and this is much higher in First World countries. At its simplest, it comes down to: How far we travel By what means we travel ...

2.8 Goods

Where to start? The Developing World can’t get enough of them and the Developed World is drowning in them. Our Footprint Analysis in 2.1 tells us that they comprise 14% of our personal consumption impact1, ranking just behind transporta...

2.9 Other Scales: Institutional, Governmental, Corporate

It has oft been stated that T10 focusses, or at least starts, at the personal scale, for reasons of understandability, but it would be irresponsible to ignore the importance of consumption – and drivers - at larger scales. Domestic consumption is ...

2.10 Consumption Myths

It seems a strange thing to do to finish the section on consumption with a word of caution about the topic. The last thing I want to do is to undermine this vital area of impact and agency, but it must be said that it is an area of considerable sm...

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1. Build the Nature-Human Relationship
1. Build the Nature-Human Relationship 1.1 Articles 1.2 Art Installations 1.3 Books 1.4 Buildings 1.5 Film, Documentaries, Podcasts 1.6 Music 1.7 Paintings 1.8 Photographs 1.9 Poems 1.10 Spiritual Responses
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1. Build the Nature-Human Relationship

This section is designed to foster appreciation and insight that will – hopefully – lead to novel ways to build a better relationship between human beings and Nature. This section is also atypical ...
2. Reduce Consumption
2. Reduce Consumption

2. Reduce Consumption

I hope Reneé Descartes would forgive us for saying that, at least for the modern world, he was wrong.  When, in 1637, he said: “I think, therefore I am”, he could not have anticipated that the majo...
3. Replace God of Growth with God of Quality
3. Replace God of Growth with God of Quality

3. Replace God of Growth with God of Quality

In a supposedly secular age there has arisen a global religion and god like never before, a religion whose reach and power makes every other belief system before it seem pitiful and insignificant: ...
4. Work, Volunteer, Act for the Environment
4. Work, Volunteer, Act for the Environment

4. Work, Volunteer, Act for the Environment

What we do in our day-to-day lives can have great impact. Section Four divides up these actions into three groups – Work (4.2 & 4.3), Volunteering (4.4), and Action, e.g. voting, protesting, et...
5. Reduce Population
5. Reduce Population

5. Reduce Population

Even on top of Mt. Everest, in one of the remotest, most difficult places on earth, there is a great traffic-jam of people jostling for position. And yet, ever more vociferously, we deny that overp...
6. Ensure Media Acknowledgement of Environmental Context
6. Ensure Media Acknowledgement of Environmental Context

6. Ensure Media Acknowledgement of Environmental Context

The media is one of the three, great ‘poles’ of power in the world (alongside political and corporate power) and how they frame and present ‘the environment’ has a profound effect on how we respond...
7. Stop Further Loss of Natural Habitat and Species
7. Stop Further Loss of Natural Habitat and Species

7. Stop Further Loss of Natural Habitat and Species

New York is an exciting, mesmerising place. Human culture is extraordinary and often wonderful. Our powers of transformation of the natural world seem limitless. The trouble is, we don’t seem to be...
8. Assist Energy Descent and Transition
8. Assist Energy Descent and Transition

8. Assist Energy Descent and Transition

Our current energy largesse is an extraordinary ‘gift’, an unprecedented gift of the ages; millions of years to produce and from millions of years ago. Coal, oil and gas, forming...
9. Support New, Environmentally-Aware, Economic Systems
9. Support New, Environmentally-Aware, Economic Systems

9. Support New, Environmentally-Aware, Economic Systems

Just as with the previous section – ‘Energy’ – which is, inescapably, all about fossil fuels so pre-eminent and extraordinary has been their dominance and transformation of the world in the last 20...
10. Reduce Wastes to the Rate of Natural Assimilation
10. Reduce Wastes to the Rate of Natural Assimilation

10. Reduce Wastes to the Rate of Natural Assimilation

Section 10 will attempt to organise this enormous topic by addressing the context and status of pollution in 10.2, before focussing in on air pollution; particularly greenhouse gas pollution and cl...