4. Etosha: Africa’s Untamed Wilderness. Living Edens Series: Alex Gregory Writer/Producer 1998

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1. Build the Nature-Human Relationship
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1.5 Film, Documentaries, Podcasts
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1.5.4

It is almost impossible to choose favourites, let alone a favourite, Nature documentary, they are so outstandingly shot and produced. Nonetheless, I will try to list one that I have never forgotten from years ago (1998) because of the way it transported me so completely into the world of Etosha, in Namibia, south-west Africa.

Etosha is a great salt pan of approximately 5,000 km2 and to its west is the Namib, a desert of the highest dunes in the world. There is a national park (~22,000 km2) and amazingly, for such an inhospitable environment, much spectacular wildlife: South-western Black Rhino, Southern White Rhino (re-introduced), African Elephant, Zebra (two sp.), Angolan Giraffe, Lion, Blue Wilderbeest, Greater Kudu, Leopard, etc…

The footage is as crisp as it is spectacular, with the spare desert environment outlined by dunes or horizon in a sort of minimalist frieze. Then, when least expected and you think you are looking at some sort of moonscape, a great Elephant wheels into view, or a pride of lions. The animals seem to be displaying on an almost blank canvas so nothing is hidden, and it all seems as unreal as it is engrossing.

Unfortunately, I cannot find access to a streaming service of the 1998 production (which was part of the excellent ‘Living Eden’ series), so have listed a more recent documentary below. You may have better luck finding it.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Nature+documentary+Etosha&docid=607987410113406718&mid=1EF0633D98F3542C58371EF0633D98F3542C5837&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

Explore More Film, Documentaries, Podcasts

1.5.1. King Kong 1933, 1976, 1986, 1998, 2005, 2017

The still above is from the 1933 classic, and watching it elicits a weird mix of emotions; from humour, to curiosity, to engagement, to sadness. There’s much that is brutal and clunky in the original, but it somehow draws the viewer in and Kong’s ...

1.5.2. My Octopus Teacher

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1.5.4. Etosha: Africa’s Untamed Wilderness. Living Edens Series

It is almost impossible to choose favourites, let alone a favourite, Nature documentary, they are so outstandingly shot and produced. Nonetheless, I will try to list one that I have never forgotten from years ago (1998) because of the way it trans...

1.5.5. Nature Walkabout

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1.5.7. Life on Earth: A Natural History

Just as with Ansel Adams’ wonderful photography (see 1.8.5), or William Blake’s ‘Tyger’ (1.9.7), it would be mean-spirited to leave out ‘Life on Earth’ just because it is so well-known. And well known it is, with an estimated 500 million people se...

1.5.8. Roger Swainston: Drawn to Water

This is a fascinating story of intense focus, exquisite skill, and most importantly, the ability to see life. When I look at a close-up of an illustration of a lobster carapace by Roger I can’t believe he’s drawn it: the detail and the irridescenc...

1.5.9. Off Track: Live Long, Little Lizard

After the ABC’s Natural History Unit was shamefully closed in 2007 there has been precious little for lovers of Nature in this, one of the world’s ‘megadiverse’ countries, and with the globe’s highest number of unique species2. Insid...

1.5.10. Hooked on Growth

Dave Gardner is the perfect heretic: softly-spoken, mild-mannered, unflappable, and with a sense of humour, very hard to demonise and marginalise as ‘crazy’, ‘eccentric’, ‘dangerous’, ‘racist’, or ‘anti-people’. Heretics are, at best, dismissed, a...

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1. Build the Nature-Human Relationship
1. Build the Nature-Human Relationship 1.1 Articles 1.2 Art Installations 1.3 Books 1.4 Buildings 1.5 Film, Documentaries, Podcasts 1.6 Music 1.7 Paintings 1.8 Photographs 1.9 Poems 1.10 Spiritual Responses
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1. Build the Nature-Human Relationship

This section is designed to foster appreciation and insight that will – hopefully – lead to novel ways to build a better relationship between human beings and Nature. This section is also atypical ...
2. Reduce Consumption
2. Reduce Consumption

2. Reduce Consumption

I hope Reneé Descartes would forgive us for saying that, at least for the modern world, he was wrong.  When, in 1637, he said: “I think, therefore I am”, he could not have anticipated that the majo...
3. Replace God of Growth with God of Quality
3. Replace God of Growth with God of Quality

3. Replace God of Growth with God of Quality

In a supposedly secular age there has arisen a global religion and god like never before, a religion whose reach and power makes every other belief system before it seem pitiful and insignificant: ...
4. Work, Volunteer, Act for the Environment
4. Work, Volunteer, Act for the Environment

4. Work, Volunteer, Act for the Environment

What we do in our day-to-day lives can have great impact. Section Four divides up these actions into three groups – Work (4.2 & 4.3), Volunteering (4.4), and Action, e.g. voting, protesting, et...
5. Reduce Population
5. Reduce Population

5. Reduce Population

Even on top of Mt. Everest, in one of the remotest, most difficult places on earth, there is a great traffic-jam of people jostling for position. And yet, ever more vociferously, we deny that overp...
6. Ensure Media Acknowledgement of Environmental Context
6. Ensure Media Acknowledgement of Environmental Context

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The media is one of the three, great ‘poles’ of power in the world (alongside political and corporate power) and how they frame and present ‘the environment’ has a profound effect on how we respond...
7. Stop Further Loss of Natural Habitat and Species
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7. Stop Further Loss of Natural Habitat and Species

New York is an exciting, mesmerising place. Human culture is extraordinary and often wonderful. Our powers of transformation of the natural world seem limitless. The trouble is, we don’t seem to be...
8. Assist Energy Descent and Transition
8. Assist Energy Descent and Transition

8. Assist Energy Descent and Transition

Our current energy largesse is an extraordinary ‘gift’, an unprecedented gift of the ages; millions of years to produce and from millions of years ago. Coal, oil and gas, forming...
9. Support New, Environmentally-Aware, Economic Systems
9. Support New, Environmentally-Aware, Economic Systems

9. Support New, Environmentally-Aware, Economic Systems

Just as with the previous section – ‘Energy’ – which is, inescapably, all about fossil fuels so pre-eminent and extraordinary has been their dominance and transformation of the world in the last 20...
10. Reduce Wastes to the Rate of Natural Assimilation
10. Reduce Wastes to the Rate of Natural Assimilation

10. Reduce Wastes to the Rate of Natural Assimilation

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